What to actually test when test driving a car

One can get too excited when buying a car. The giddiness clouds judgment and might distract a buyer from asking the right questions, checking the crucial aspects of automotive performance, and just about anything that could make them arrive at an informed decision. And a shiny, new vehicle is too expensive for anyone not to labor over the weighing of possible options.

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The best way to evaluate one’s choices is to do a test drive. This can help a person understand better the particular considerations that go with purchasing a new car. There are varying factors that might need the buyer’s attention when test driving for the experience to truly assist them in the process of picking the right one.

A necessary pre-test drive procedure that a lot of people want to skip is research. One should have reviewed several car specifications and features that match their lifestyle and unique requisites even before the visit to the dealership. Before the drive, cosmetic details must be scrutinized. Make sure to check for dents, scratches, paint evenness, etc. When going through the actual test drive, one can easily decide on a number of basic requirements like the physical comfort and feel of the hand on the wheel, the body on the seat, and the feet on the pedals.

Try to find less-than-ideal routes for the test drive to examine how the car responds to various road surfaces one might encounter during the daily commute. Take note of other significant responses from the car when you hit the brakes, make a turn, or accelerate.

The 21st century brings with it a host of advancements in car technology. The safety systems and smartphone integrations must be checked if one wants to fully avail of the modern driving experience that new models offer. For example, blind spot monitors and Bluetooth connectivity should be studied and tried before sealing the deal.

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Jeff Lupient is currently the president and CEO of the Lupient Automotive Group. He is a top-notch manager who participates actively in the operations of his business. Learn more about the business by visiting this site.

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How The Iot Affects The Automotive Industry

Vehicles now are becoming more connected and software-driven than ever. And with the continuous progress of the Internet of Things (IoT), vehicles are seen to advance beyond having seamless links with smartphones, navigation or tracking, real-time traffic information, and other current technologies.

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The following are some of the ways IoT can influence car manufacturers:

  • It can create additional revenue streams. It is said that by 2020, more than 250 million cars will be connected to the internet. This presents an opportunity for carmakers to open up new areas where they could rake in more revenue. For example, car owners are used to purchasing automotive devices, such as in-car entertainment, dash cams, or diagnostic tools, separately. But car manufacturers instead add such features to new models.
  • Carmakers might transition into technological companies. Deloitte University Press mentioned in a report on the future of car technology that, “Automakers fear that, should they lose control of the customer to software providers, cars could become commodity devices secondary to the software they run.” And IoT is fueling this trend. Thus, carmakers need to keep up by developing and improving their own technological capabilities, which is what Tesla has already started doing.
  • The arrival of commercial driverless cars is nearing. The necessary equipment needed for autonomous cars, such as sensors, laser-based radars, onboard computers, communication devices, and others, can be interconnected seamlessly because of IoT.
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Jeff Lupient has skills and expertise in automotive retail sales, having worked in the industry since he was only 15 years old. For more insights about the automotive industry, follow this Facebook page.